Jobspring Partners: Talent in Action

The Jobspring Experience

RSS

Category: Happy Recruiters (239)

  • Jobspring Partners wins San Jose's Best Employment Agency Award

    Jobspring Partners' Silicon Valley office has been selected for the 2017 Best of San Jose Award in the Employment Agency category by the San Jose Award Program.

    Each year, the San Jose Award Program identifies companies that they believe have achieved exceptional marketing success in their local community and business category. These are local companies that enhance the positive image of small business through service to their customers and our community. These exceptional companies help make the San Jose area a great place to live, work and play.

    "It's an honor to recieve the "2017 Best of San Jose" award. We've worked hard to build a positive reputation in the recruiting industry and our local community," says Jason Cooper, Division Manager of Jobspring Partners in Silicon Valley. "We appreciate the recognition and will strive to continue providing superior service to our clients and candidates here in Silicon Valley." 

    The winners are determined based on the information gathered both internally by the San Jose Award Program and data provided by third parties. Recognition is given to those companies that have shown the ability to use their best practices and implemented programs to generate competitive advantages and long-term value.

    The San Jose Award Program is an annual awards program honoring the achievements and accomplishments of local businesses throughout the San Jose area. Their mission is to recognize the small business community's contributions to the U.S. economy.


    Related Articles: 

  • Busting the 4 Biggest Myths for Tech Job Seekers

    With over 400 highly specialized tech recruiting professionals across North America, our agency experts know firsthand how people think and act during the hiring process. Our 2016 research study debunks the biggest misperceptions for tech job seekers and offers helpful advice on how to navigate today’s competitive job market. Here are the four most common myths you should know: 

    Myth 1: “If I don’t have all the required skills, I shouldn’t bother applying for the job.”

    Advice from the experts: “Know where you stand and act accordingly. If you’re less qualified, be prepared to make your business case upfront on your resume or cover letter as to why they should still consider you. Always apply to jobs even if you are not sure since you are applying to the company (not just the job). Other jobs may exist that will be a better fit. Also, job specs can be very fluid in tech and some companies can/will adjust requirements and provide training for the right person.”

    Check out which companies are hiring by applying to one of our many tech jobs online!

    Myth 2: “If I’ve been a job hopper, potential employers will not consider me for the position.”

    Advice from the experts: “It’s not the WHEN, it’s the WHY that counts most when explaining job hopping to a potential employer. There are many completely understandable reasons for leaving a job after a short period of time. Make sure to specify any of these acceptable reasons for leaving directly on the resume to avoid any negative stigmas.”

    Read why "Don't be afraid to try different things" is tip #3 in "5 Tips For Young Professionals Who Want a Career in Tech"

    Myth 3: “If the company has no job postings online, then they must not be hiring.”    

    Advice from the experts: “The elusiveness of the tech job market means that candidates should never rely on job boards alone. They should leverage their networks as much as possible and also work with a localized, specialized tech recruiter who uncovers these hidden jobs on a daily basis.”

     Let us help you discover your dream job - Contact a Jobspring Partners in a city near you!

    Myth 4: “If I’m the leading candidate for a Perm position, I should be able to negotiate my starting offer as high as I’d like.”

    Advice from the experts: “As highly qualified as a tech candidate may be, there is and will always be competition. A candidate’s savvy negotiation and education on the marketplace (via salary reports) is expected from employers. But when candidates exhibit indulgence or entitlement in regards to a potential offer, their well-intentioned actions could backfire on them.”

    Find out the Expectations versus Realities of Working in Tech

    There are several myths out there about the tech job market, but the key is to identify these myths and not fall into the trap that many other job seekers may unknowingly fall into. To sum up, (1) if you’re less qualified, be prepared to make your business case upfront as to why a company should still consider you; (2) if you’re a job hopper, be sure to specify acceptable reasons for leaving on your resume to avoid negative stigmas; (3) never rely on job boards alone, instead, leverage your network and work with a specialized tech recruiter in your city; and (4) don’t be that candidate who exhibits indulgence or entitlement in regards to a potential offer – it could backfire on you. 

    Contact a local Jobspring Partners today and let us help you kick off 2017 on the right foot.

    Related Articles: 

  • 13 Halloween Costume Ideas for You and Your Tech Team

    With Halloween right around the corner, you might have already been thinking about your Halloween costume - but don't dress up by yourself! Put together a costume for you and your team to show off during work on October 31.

    Not only is it a fun and unique way to collaborate together but according to US News, “these exercises can help employees work on more serious issues, such as learning problem-solving techniques and improving communication skills. This all helps them to build trust, which goes a long way toward achieving better communication.”

    Additionally, according to Great Places to Work, creating a space to celebrate seasonal events, such as Halloween, can go a long way toward building camaraderie at work. The global authority on high-trust, high-performance workplace cultures cited 30-to-40-percent higher levels of employee collaboration, cooperation and willingness to give extra to get the job done at organizations with strong levels of camaraderie. (Business Wire)

    So get ready to build your workplace culture and dress up as someone else for All Hallows' Eve. Here are some fantastic examples of group Halloween costumes ideas, as dreamed up by our own teams across North America. 

    Pay homage to your favorite franchise...

    Shark Week 

    Star Wars

    Pokemon

    The Kardashians

    Why is strong work culture so important? Read how it relates to your next job.

     

    Throw it back with a nostaligic costume...

     

    Legends of the Hidden Temple

    Scooby Doo

    Rugrats

     

    Maybe you just want to be comfortable and "onesie" with your team...

    Onesies

    Village People / YMCA

     Want to join the fun? All 10 Jobspring locations are hiring!

     

    Last but not least, go as your favorite Programming Language! 

    Chef, Puppet, Ansible, AWS

    Mustache, Backbone, React, Batman, Knockout

    Red Hat, Chef, Linux, Jenkins, Python 

    Building a strong company culture begins one day at time, but it's how top tech talent will accept the job offer and stay for years. When looking for your next job, consider if it's the best culture fit. If you are currently searching, let us connect you with some of the top rated and award winning companies in your area!

    You might also like: 

  • 5 Unique Ways to Build Culture with Your Team

    Company culture is no longer a nice-to-have for your employment brand or at your current job. According to Indeed’s 2016 Job Happiness Index analyzing over 10 million employee reviews, culture ranks #3 – over both compensation & benefits AND job security & advancement – as to what makes a job satisfying overall.

    Company culture isn’t something that can easily be built overnight. It’s a unique blend of employee traditions, values, and vision that everyone can share in the work environment. You can see it in something as simple as happy hour after work, rewarding a team goal with dinner, or the lunchtime ping pong tournament.

    The truth is, to build a company with a strong culture, there has to be a balance of work and fun that starts at the ground-level. Culture-building activities like these unique activities will keep everyone on their toes, as well as build rapport between team members. 

     

    1)      Unique Dining Experiences

    Go beyond the typical happy hour or Taco Tuesday. Seek out unique dining experiences that will keep people talking about more than the food. One example is LA’s Dining in the Dark Experience, where guests are seated in pitch black darkness. If you take away the visual element, would the food taste better? Without eye contact, would the conversation be more open?

    Culture is just one piece of the puzzle. How do you know you’re at the right job? 

    2) Escape Challenges

    Engineers work together to solve tough problems all the time, so why not put those skills to test in a mock life-or-death situation. Escape rooms can range from escaping a hell house to solving a mystery in space! With the clock clicking down the entire time, teams either triumph or have a hilarious time scrambling to solve the puzzle. Escape or capture, the team synergy will be flowing by the time the clock runs out.

     

    3) Sports Leagues

    No matter what sport you choose – bowling, ultimate Frisbee, kickball, or beyond – nothing builds teamwork like sports. In Chicago (pictured below), the office all came together to play softball and ended up winning their league! The employees became culture and brand cheerleaders as they plastered the win across social media. Choose a sport that is fun to watch and play so you can get everyone involved.

    Want to join the fun? We’re hiring at Jobspring Partners across North America!

     

    4) Experience Nature

    Every week, most employees spend hours indoors, perhaps without windows. To unplug and experience raw nature on a hike or a beach day can not only build great relationships, but help everyone refresh and recharge. Get away from the screen for a day while also getting in touch with the world outside your office building. Think your team might get bored instead of engaged? Throw in a scavenger hunt or a game of ultimate Frisbee.

     

    5) Community Service

    Everyone wants to make an impact in the world and, either through small projects on their own or in more organized settings, the feeling is rewarding and deeply universal. By tackling a large project as a group, you can carry out a larger project to completion, with the satisfaction that as a part of the company you’re contributing to the greater good. You’ll also know it was only possible because everyone lent a hand. Prime culture-building while giving back! (Below: Jobspring Boston volunteering for Cradles to Crayons.)

    These are just a few activities you can try with your team or suggest to your manager. Ultimately, you want to ask yourself what will make your group excited to participate. Capture these moments and display them where everyone can see as a reminder of the strides you, your team, and your company are making toward greatness. Moments like these can help you create a strong company culture where people look forward to coming into work every day.  

      

    Related articles

  • The Expectations and Realities of Working in Tech [ADVICE FROM SILICON VALLEY]

    "I want to work in Tech because I want to make a lot of money."

    "I want to work in Tech because I want to get free food everyday."

    "Every office is beautiful like Google."

    When people think of working in Tech, they often have a lot of misconceptions of what life is actually like. Scott Purcell, Division Manager of Jobspring San Jose, sheds some light on some common expectations people have.

    1. Expectation: You have to work long hours

    Reality: Each company is different. Some startups work long hours often and some have a relatively normal work-life balance. Some big companies have very long hours while others are very flexible. Every situation is different and needs to be taken on a case by case basis. The normal "9 to 5" work hour doesn't really exist, but some companies have longer hours during releases or allow telecommute and/or flex hours.  

    Lucky for the tech industry, there is a choice between working full-time and contract positions. If you choose the contract road, there are some benefits such as getting paid for every hour you work as a contractor and receiving overtime when you're asked to stay on for those late nights. This isn't to discount full-time, though, because long hours usually mean raises, bonuses and a higher worth on your stock options.

    Think your comapny has a great workplace for technology professionals? Nominate it to be Sillicon Valley's Best Tech Work Culture here.

    2. Expectation: Coding and programming for a big company's IT department means you have to work in a cubicle in a dark basement

    Reality: Every company's environment is different. Specifically in Silicon Valley, most companies have moved away from the cubicle environment and work more in an open, collaborative atmosphere.

    A lot of companies really believe in an open space environment. According to Inc., an open environment allows you to immerse yourself into an office culture and improves communication. Also, non-tech companies need talent too, as this SkilledUp article says. The benefits could be less catchy but more tangible. For instance, if you're interested in helping others and developing better patient care, you might want to work for the healthcare industry, which in turn as a non-tech company could be less stringent about your skill sets as job requirements, and more open to skill set plus industry experience. So not only will you not get moved to the basement, there are some definite benefits to working for a tech department over a tech company.

    Want to jump start your tech career? Check out all our job postings.

    3. Expectation: Your work perks will automatically include free lunch and your own massage therapist

    Reality: A lot of companies do offer "extras" like lunch, travel and other perks, but that is not always the case. Many companies do this as a way to attract talent or if they aren't close to dining options. A lot of factors go into what a company offers and many companies have moved away from these types of perks to focus on core benefits and building a successful business.

    Benefits of workplaces like the ones on the Glassdoor List of Top 20 Best Company Benefits & Perks - which include every other Friday off, ski passes and sabbaticals - have slanted job hunter's perception of what really matters. However, this Glassdoor study shows that among the factors that contribute to happiness at your job, benefits and perks rank fifth after culture, career opportunities, senior leadership and work-life balance.

    4. Expectation: You will automatically get a big raise at your next job based on how good the market is

    Reality: One of the most common misconceptions, specifically in Silicon Valley but in this job market in general, is that they will automatically get a big raise at their next job. This is typically based on hearing how good the market is and the general cost of living in tech hubs like Silicon Valley. The reality? Companies have set ranges for their positions and value employees based on what they can bring to the table and how they fit into their current pay structure. If you're already at the top of the range, which isn't uncommon, there may not be much wiggle room on salary - despite hearing about what others are getting in the market.

    Ready to start job searching? Here are some resources to help guide you to a job you’ll love:

  • Artificial Intelligence: Should All Wishes Come True?

    Article by Patrick Tafua, Practice Manager in Jobspring Orange County 

    My fascination and curiosities of Artificial Intelligence (AI) began at Disneyland. It was my first job and I worked on attractions in Tomorrowland, the futuristic themed area of the theme park. While working at the resort you really gain an appreciation for the innovative or ‘magical’ mind of Walt Disney. One particular favorite innovation of mine is Audio-Animatronic figures throughout the park. Audio Animatronics is a form of robotics animation. These robots move, make sound that is generally recorded and are often fixed upon whatever supports them. Although the movements and sounds of the robots are prerecorded it brings these figures to life for its audiences. I feel that this innovative technology sparked the wishes of engineers to make AI more of a reality and a part of our lives. Which asks the question; should all wishes come true?

    AI has the potential of making lives easier by understanding our desires or driving our automobiles and more. If uncontrolled though, the technology could be a serious threat to society. At least that is what many of the top scientist and technology leaders in world, such as Elon Musk and Stephen Hawking, are proclaiming. A letter written by Musk, Hawking and other prominent scientists, stated that, "Because of the great potential of AI, it is important to research how to reap its benefits while avoiding potential pitfalls.” Also stated was that these systems should be controlled to do what we want them to do and add benefits to society. Stephen Hawking had gone further stating that AI development could “spell the end of the human race”. So where do you stand on AI?

    Find your dream job in Orange County.

    It seems that there isn't much you can do at this time to stop AI developments from happening if you were opposed. This battle to bring AI to the hands of consumers has been in motion for long time. Recently we are seeing developments of robots to be personal caregivers. For example Robear, a high-tech teddy developed in Japan with a mission to help make elderly care much easier. There are many other technological advances being made in AI. These robotic figures do not have prerecorded audio or movements like those at Disneyland. Some of these machines can process regular spoken language and not only recognize human faces, but also read our expressions. It only seems fitting to discuss what AI will become in the workplace.

    Zeynep Tufekci of the New York Times wrote that computers do not just replace humans in the workplace. She states, “They shift the balance of power even more in favor of employers. Our normal response to technological innovation that threatens jobs is to encourage workers to acquire more skills, or to trust that the nuances of the human mind or human attention will always be superior in crucial ways. But when machines of this capacity enter the equation, employers have even more leverage, and our standard response is not sufficient for the looming crisis.”

    AI could have machines doing our jobs well enough to make it cheaper for employers and easier to control than an employee that would have their own opinion on work matters. Certainly, engineers in technology may not have to worry about their job security right now because of the high demand recently in our county for engineering talent, but these engineers may create the reason they are out of a job in the future. In Orange County, there isn't much AI development being done, but we still have Disney’s Audio-Animatronics to inspire local engineers to come up with the next big AI. It’s just - do we really want to make these dreams become reality?

  • How to be Successful as a Young Manager

    Article by Alston Chiang, Practice Manager at Jobspring New York 

    Jobspring Partners is a staffing agency that only promotes from within, and moving from an entry-level employee to a manager can happen quickly, or it can take some time. In my case, it happened within a year and a half. The stages of growth are exciting and at times overwhelming as the job functionalities change drastically.

    A year and a half ago I moved from San Francisco to New York City in nine days to open up a brand new recruiting team focused on UX, UI, and Product Management. I had to hire a sales team, train them, build a pipeline of business, and recruit candidates in a completely unknown market in a town that was foreign to me. My biggest insecurity was managing a staff that was my own age, and possibly even older than me. How would they respect me if they knew I was the same age as them? Could we have a relationship that went beyond peer to peer contact? Would they be motivated to perform?

    Hire top tech talent for your team in New York today.

    To facilitate this process, I came up with a few simple guidelines to ensure success:

    1. Set the example – Sales is all about numbers. If you’re team is going to perform, you need to set the example on your own desk. This also means coming to work prepared and showing them how you want the job done. No one will take you seriously if you roll into work 15 minutes late with your shirt untucked.

    2. Implement structures that are easy to follow – Hold them accountable for the goals that you set together. Make sure you and your team are actively tracking and discussing progress. Give feedback using concrete facts as opposed to generating feedback that comes from a personal or emotional place.

    3. Empathize with your staff – You might be their age, but remember that you have more experience in the field. Use this experience to help guide them while using your age to relate to them on a personal, yet professional level.

    Since implementing these guidelines, which actually weren’t that different than the guidelines that my first managers used back in San Francisco, I have been able to find success. Growing pains are common and normal being a new manager and the road certainly hasn’t been easy—people have come and gone just as stress and doubt have ebbed and flowed.

    I’ve come to understand that age really is just a number, and that experience is what actually matters. Experience is what gets you promoted and age is an unrelated signifier. Success comes from vision; specifically, your vision to see goals, how to achieve those goals and build confidence based on experiences. Anyone who aims to succeed in their career listens to their mentors. A good mentor guides staff to inspire them to hit their goals.

    Above all, I’ve discovered that success is relative. Some days success might mean that your team is dominating the competition, but other days it may mean that you accomplished a simple task. And that’s okay. As a young manager, I’m going through my own growing process and perhaps that has been the biggest success of all.

    To this day I’m proud of myself for taking a huge cross-country leap to start my team here in New York. Never be afraid of an opportunity – especially an opportunity to challenge yourself.

     

  • Ask the Tough Question: "Why?"

    Article by Keith Wilson, Practice Manager in Jobspring Philadelphia.

    Keith Wilson, Jobspring Partners

    Do you want all of your questions answered? If so, start asking one simple question: Why. It’s nothing revolutionary, but at the same time, it’s also counterintuitive. Growing up, I was always instructed to do as I was told. This process served me well in both school and sports. Once I transitioned into recruiting after college, I was educated on the benefits of digging deeper and asking why I should do the things I was being asked to do. Over the years, I came to understand that all of the answers I wanted were right at my disposal. I just had to ask for them. So as an interviewer or interviewee, why do you need to ask the tough question?

    Start searching for your next project in Philadelphia

    To Fully Understand the Situation

    The ability to understand is fundamental to being successful as both an employer and employee. This sounds elementary, but I've experienced what happens when I dive head-first into a project/task without asking any questions. Mistakes are made, but lessons learned quickly. Your strategy should be to understand the full scope of the process and figure out how your actions are going to align with the end goal. Whether you are an employer or employee, these details will allow you to properly diagnose the situation and help you pivot accordingly.

    To Get a Deeper Perspective

    For example, if I am speaking with a client that’s looking to hire 5 engineers over the next 2 months, I need to understand why. Obviously, your hiring spree is great news, but what’s the driving force behind this need? Are these positions out of growth, or did the entire team quit because they are working 60 hours a week? This is just a basic example to illustrate a simple situation where the “why” is vital in moving forward. Once I know the underlying facts of the situation, I can move forward, properly educated, with an eye on the expectations that lie ahead.

    Sidenote: There is no need to probe people on sensitive information that may not be professional. That is not the purpose behind these conversations. If you lay up the question properly, it will be well-received. Don’t make it weird.

    To Receive Feedback You May Not Want, But Still Need

    You do not want to shy away from the tough questions in your own life, either. Asking your boss why you didn’t get the promotion may not come easy, but it may be advice that will advance your career in the long run. Sometimes you just need to delve deeper than surface-level to understand what’s going on. When you remove the roadblocks behind that “why”, your vision will become clearer.

    This isn’t a fool proof plan, but it’s a great exercise to practice. Try it the next time you’re working on a new project with a co-worker or friend and see if you receive some feedback that you weren’t previously aware of. This may allow the creative juices to flow a bit easier and lead you to your next breakthrough. Remember, sometimes nothing is more powerful than the three letter word: Why.


Showing 8 of 239 posts

Send to a Friend

If you know someone who'd be interested in this post, send them a link so they can check it out.

Thank You!

Your note on blog page: has been sent to your friend